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Facebook Deletes Fake Likes on Fan Pages September 28, 2012

Posted by Mark Hillary in Current Affairs, Internet, Software.
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Facebook has started deleting fake ‘likes’ on fan pages after confessing that around 8.7% of all likes were probably false.

The BBC’s technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones, tried an experiment earlier this year where he set up a company page on Facebook – offering bagels – and despite having no information about the products on the page it quickly attracted over 1,600 ‘likes’.

Many of the most popular Facebook pages have started shedding a large number of ‘likes’ including pop stars such as Lady Gaga.

This might all be seen as just a storm in a teacup by many, tinkering around with algorithms in much the same way as Google does all the time when they have a regular review to improve search results. But it is more significant.

Advertising is now a significant source of income for Facbeook and the number of times a product or company page is ‘liked’ has an effect on how often that page appears in the news stream of fans.

For Facebook to continue building a business model based on genuine fans with a genuine desire to learn more about products, they need to demonstrate to companies that fans on Facebook are real people – not robots automatically liking every new page.

It is significant that Facebook is undertaking this clean-up, but it is worth noting the flipside of the argument, that over 9 out of 10 ‘likes’ are by real people – and now the fakes are being removed, brands can be assured that figure is getting higher and more trustworthy.

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Photo by Urs Steiner licensed under Creative Commons

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Managing IPR in a digital age August 22, 2011

Posted by Mark Hillary in IT Services, Outsourcing.
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So you have a dilemma.

You may well already use an outsourced or managed service environment and it all works well, but then the supplier calls and offers to start doing some extra parts of your supply chain. Moving up the value chain as the expression goes.

That’s great too, provided it’s a supplier you know and trust. Why not ask them to take on more work if you know you can trust them to deliver?

But the thing that often worries clients is how they can outsource higher-end work without losing control of their intellectual property.

It’s a dilemma, because the boundary of the organisation is constantly shifting, but where contracts are concerned, someone needs to take a decision so services can be defined. But when are the key parts of the relationship to check on if you are going to extend a process outsourcing relationship?

  • First, is to ensure you have all your IP protected anyway using tools such as trademarks or copyright. You need to have your own house in order first.
  • Second, is to review the contract with your supplier. Can you ensure that you retain IP rights even if the supplier creates value and possibly even invents new processes for you?
  • Third, be aware of your own limits. There is always a pragmatic limit about what can and can’t be protected, so make sure you have also considered the difference between what the law says and what you really can do in the event of a breach.
  • Fourth, review all practical security measures that can be taken  around the relationship, hand-offs, and the delivery site so that confidential IP cannot be removed from site.
  • Fifth, identify where the supplier may be working for your competition and so-called ‘Chinese walls’ need to be extremely strong.

In most cases, if you have a great supplier at one level, then they will be able to scale up to the next level. It is usually beneficial for the supplier (more business) as well as the client (more services provided by a trusted and already proven partner) so this should not be considered a dangerous strategy.

In fact, it’s going to be essential for most firms to turn to trusted partners more and more, just to achieve the kind of performance expected of a twenty-first century business.

Ensuring you can work with an ecosystem of partners whilst still protecting your valuable IP is all just a part of doing business in a globally connected environment.

Can a supplier contract exist without putting it in writing? August 23, 2010

Posted by Mark Hillary in IT Services, Outsourcing.
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Let’s shake on it. It’s a common enough agreement and it seems offensive to shake a on deal and then to refuse to take any further role in the business agreement until a contract is in place, but is the contract essential? Does the handshake really mean anything in law?

I have found myself in a situation several times where a company suggests that I work on a project, I do some work immediately because there is a sense of urgency or a deadline, and when we start talking commercials the agreement falls down. That can be annoying for me, as well as disappointing for the company I am working for, but does it always need to be like this?

It’s also common in outsourcing to find that these agreements are put in place and never documented. Either it’s because the supplier begins work urgently, before the formal agreement is signed, or there is some informal service agreement that is not in the contract. It can also be that two firms with an agreement carry on working after their official contract expires.
So if the contract doesn’t contain a specification of what is required or the contract has expired then is there really any contract at all?

Implied contracts do exist when parties have agreed orally or carried on working past the life of a contract, but it’s important to remember, the same terms don’t apply. Just because a condition was in the original contract, does not mean it can be applied when there is a dispute over the ongoing service.

So the handshake does have some value, even in law, but cannot replace a formal service contract.